Persimmon Bread Recipe

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This persimmon bread recipe is perfect for using up persimmon pulp and making delicious gifts this season!

Persimmon bread is delicious sweet bread that you can enjoy for breakfast or dessert. It makes a wonderful gift during the fall and winter holidays as well.

A slice of persimmon bread served on a plate. The cut loaf sits behind it and a mug sits at the back to the left.

Persimmon Fruit

Believe it or not, persimmons are a berry. They come in a few varieties and range in size and color.

The two main types of persimmons are Fuyu and Hachiya.

Fuyu persimmons are the less astringent of the two types of persimmons. They can be eaten like and apple and taste better while still on the firmer side (but not rock hard).

Hachiya persimmons are the more astringent of the two types. You know thee are ready to eat when they are overly soft. Think of an over-ripe avocado or tomato.

For a recipe like this, I have found that Fuyu persimmons cook into an apple sauce-like consistency the best.

If all you have are Hachiya persimmons, let them get very soft and simply mash or blend them into something similar to apple sauce. No cooking required.

What Do Persimmons Taste Like?

A good persimmon at its peak will taste sweet, mild, and rich. Many people have described its flavor as “honey-like.” It’s texture is similar to that of an apricot and its skin is a bit tougher than an apple’s.

Source: MyRecipes
A whole loaf of persimmon bread sits, ready to be sliced on a marble counter top.

How To Ripen Persimmons

Never eat an un-ripened Hachiya persimmon. It won’t be a pleasant experience.

The best way to ripen a Hachiya persimmon quickly is to put it in a paper back with an apple or banana. It can take up to 6 days for them to fully ripen. And once they are ripe, you should eat them immediately.

Fuyu persimmons can be eaten at almost any stage. Though you don’t want to try and eat one if it’s rock hard. But they are very similar to apples both in firmness and in how you usually eat them or cook with them.

What To Do With Persimmons

Depending on the type of persimmon you have, there are different things you can do with them. While there is some crossover, certain types of persimmons are better for some recipes than others. So pay attention to the type of persimmon called for in a recipe and do not switch types.

Uses for persimmons include:

  • Jam
  • Fruit butter
  • Breakfast casseroles
  • Smoothies
  • Parfaits
  • Persimmon bars
  • Persimmon candy
  • Fruit leather
  • Salsa
  • Roasted persimmons (great over ice cream)
  • Cooked with meats such as chicken
  • Mixed into grain salads
  • In pasta
  • Fresh salads
  • In sorbet
  • Baked into sweet breads
  • Used in tarts

When Are Persimmons Ripe?

Fuyu persimmons can be eaten at pretty much any stage of ripeness. So pick a nice one off the tree and dig in, just like you would with an apple.

Hachiya persimmons however, are ripe when they are very soft like an over ripe tomato. My mom used to leave them to ripen on the windowsill over the kitchen sink. But setting them on the counter until they are super soft is what most folks do. It can take about six days for them to get soft, so be patient.

How To Eat Persimmons

As mentioned above, that depends on the type you have.

Fuyus can be cooked, baked or eaten like an apple.

Hachiyas are best cooked or baked with. They make great fruit leather or persimmon candy.

Three slices of bread cut off of the loaf of Persimmon Bread.

How To Serve Persimmons

Pretty much any way you see fit.

Fuyus are great sliced and served fresh like other fruits while Hachiyas are usually best served as part of a dish or turned into something else. Hachiyas are wonderful to eat raw, but messy to serve if you are serving guests.

What You’ll Need

  • 1 cup persimmon pulp – This is best made out of Hichaya persimmons, but can be made out of Fuyu’s as well if they get cooked enough to break down the fruit. If you’d like to make pulp in your slow cooker, try this recipe for slow cooker persimmon pulp. It’s easy!
  • ¼ cup unsweetened milk – I say unsweetened because I used almond milk. You can use dairy milk if you wish, or any other non-dairy milk.
  • 2 large egg whites – I used egg whites to cut down on the general fat content, but you can use 1 whole egg if that’s not your goal.
  • ½ cup oil – You’ll want a light-flavored oil. Grapeseed oil is a good choice.
  • ½ cup honey – Use your favorite kind. Any type of honey will work. You can also try maple syrup, but the bread won’t end up being as sweet and it will be missing that distinct honey flavor.
  • 1 ½ tsp. pure vanilla extract – I used bourbon vanilla, but you can use any vanilla as long as it’s the real stuff.
  • 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour – Some folks have a hard time finding whole wheat pastry flour. If this is the case, look for white whole what flour. It’s the next best thing. Regular whole wheat flour will work, but it will give you a much coarser and stiffer bread.
  • ½ tsp. salt – I used Himalayan pink salt, but any salt you have on hand should do the trick.
  • ½ tsp. baking soda – Make sure you have fresh baking soda or your bread won’t rise properly. Not sure if yours is fresh? Scroll down on this page for a way to test it on Sally’s Baking Addiction.
  • 2 tsp. baking powder – The same rule applies here. Make sure it’s fresh or it won’t work. And if you need to test it, click the link I just mentioned above, for a way to do that.
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon – This adds wonderful flavor. Don’t skip it!

How To make Persimmon Bread

Oven temperature sent to 350 F.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

The flour and persimmon pulp in separate bowls.

Oil and flour two small loaf pans. Mix all wet ingredients in a large bowl. Mix all dry ingredients in a large bowl.

The mixed persimmon bread batter in it's mixing bowl.

Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients.

The persimmon bread batter in a loaf pan, ready to bake.

Pour into loaf pans. Bake for 60 – 75 minutes, or until a knife poked into the center comes out clean. Remove from oven and allow to cool for about 15 minutes.

A plate with a slice of Persimmon Bread just cut from the loaf that sits behind it.

Turn over onto a cooling rack, and continue to cool. Slice and serve.

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Three thick slices of persimmon bread are stacked on a plate with a persimmon sitting on top.

More Sweet Bread Recipes

Recipes Used

Copyright Information For The Gracious Pantry

Persimmon Bread Recipe

A slice of persimmon bread served on a plate. The cut loaf sits behind it and a mug sits at the back to the left.

Persimmon Bread Recipe

Delicious persimmon bread that's perfect for a gift or for breakfast (or both!).
5 from 2 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 35 minutes
Servings: 2 standard size loaves
Calories: 1360kcal
Author: The Gracious Pantry

Equipment

  • 2 standard loaf pans (non-stick are best)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup persimmon pulp
  • ¼ cup unsweetened milk (coconut milk, or almond milk, or… you can use regular milk too.)
  • 2 large egg whites
  • ½ cup oil (grapeseed is a good choice)
  • ½ cup honey
  • 1 ½ tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
    Oven temperature sent to 350 F.
  • Oil and flour two small loaf pans.
    Mix all wet ingredients in a large bowl.
    Mix all dry ingredients in a large bowl.
    The flour and persimmon pulp in separate bowls.
  • Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients.
    The mixed persimmon bread batter in it's mixing bowl.
  • Pour into loaf pans.
    Bake for 60 – 75 minutes, or until a knife poked into the center comes out clean.
    Remove from oven and allow to cool for about 15 minutes.
    The persimmon bread batter in a loaf pan, ready to bake.
  • Turn over onto a cooling rack, and continue to cool.
    Slice and serve.
    A plate with a slice of Persimmon Bread just cut from the loaf that sits behind it.

Notes

Please Note: Nutrition data is for one entire loaf. Divide that data by the number of slices you get from one loaf. The nutrition data below is a ballpark figure. Exact data is not possible.

Nutrition

Serving: 1standard loaf | Calories: 1360kcal | Carbohydrates: 201g | Protein: 22g | Fat: 60g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Sodium: 893mg | Potassium: 1434mg | Fiber: 14g | Sugar: 71g | Vitamin A: 63IU | Vitamin C: 79mg | Calcium: 354mg | Iron: 8mg

Recipe from the Gracious Pantry archives, originally posted 12/26/2009.

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11 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Hey! I love your blog! Your recipes look amazing…I am definitely going to try that persimmon bread!

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Thanks Michelle! Let me know how it turns out for you!

  2. When i return from Rome I’m trying this! I love Persimmons so much!

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Michelle – Rome!!! Have fun! I’ve been there and it’s absolutely fabulous!

  3. I can’t wait to try this when their back in season…my parents have a persimmon tree!! A great guilt-free treat!!

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Julie – Yes they are. And so good for you too!

  4. The Gracious Pantry says:

    Olivia – The 5 stevia packets are what happened there. All recipes, especially in baking, are all about ratios. Wet to dry ratios. So when you add more dry, it soaks up more liquid, giving you more of a dough than a batter.

    Let me know how it turns out with the bananas!

  5. graciouspantry says:

    You can try, I haven’t tried it myself so I’m not sure. If you turn them into muffins, shorten the baking time a bit because they will bake faster. If you add oats, you may need to add a bit more moisture to the recipe as they will soak up moisture as they bake. Let me know how it turns out!

  6. graciouspantry says:

    Yes. They are two different types of wheat. The pastry variety has less gluten and is a finer grind.

  7. I’ve never cooked with persimmons. Do you just peel and cut them or scoop out the flesh and mash it? What’s the best way to get the pulp?

    1. Kathy – The link to the recipe is under “Recipes Used”, just above the recipe card. That’s how I make it, but there are other ways.

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