Persimmon Pulp Recipe

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Persimmon pulp is useful stuff. It’s great for baking, parfaits and all sorts of desserts.

While I do want to share this recipe for persimmon pulp with you here, I think I should also cover some persimmon basics for those who don’t know.

Clean Eating Persimmon Pulp

It’s amazing to me that so few people around me have had persimmons. Some of my neighbors didn’t even know what they were! So here’s a quick “persimmon 101” lesson for you. Then I’ll move on to the recipe.

There are two types of persimmons, Fuyu and Hachiya. They are loaded with good-for-you nutrients, and are great for bolstering your immune system during the colder months. They have been used to treat everything from hiccups to cancer as a natural remedy and are even credited with phytochemicals that help prevent aging. How’s that for a super fruit?!

Hachiya Persimmons

Pictured below. These are longer “acorn shaped” persimmons that you eat when very soft. Eating them while they are still even slightly hard is a very unpleasant experience to say the least. (Not that I know from personal experience or anything… ehem…). Please allow your Hachiyas to sit on your windowsill until they are so soft you would swear they are rotten. You should be able to compare them to a rotten tomato. Soft, soft, soft!

A single Hachiya Persimmon laying on it's side on a dark background

Fuyu Persimmons

Shown below. These look similar to tomatoes, but they are treated just like an apple. Peel, slice and eat.

Just like apples, you can cook them and turn them into an “apple-sauce” like pulp, which can be added or turned into just about any recipe. These are the persimmons I have on hand, so these are the persimmons used in the following recipe.

Three Fuyu Persimmons in a row on a dark background.

Persimmon pulp is nothing but persimmons, some water and a little cinnamon. But I thought a “how to” might be in order. So here’s the process.

What You’ll Need

4 medium Fuyu persimmons – These are the flat, apple-shaped persimmons.

1 tsp. ground cinnamon – This is optional, but it adds nice flavor.

2 cups water – You might not need all of this. You don’t want to fully cover the persimmons, so if you don’t need it all, don’t use it all.

How To Make Persimmon Pulp

Four whole persimmons sitting on a cutting board about to be made into persimmon pulp.

I used Fuyu persimmons for this. If you prefer to use Hachiyas, let them get super soft and scoop the flesh out of the skin. Then mash with a fork if needed. You do not need to cook Hachiyas to make persimmon pulp.

The persimmons cut and de-stemmed and ready to go into the slow cooker.

Wash, de-stem and cut the persimmons into quarters.

The persimmons, cinnamon and water in the slow cooker, ready to cook.

Put the persimmons, water and cinnamon in a slow cooker.

Squishing a persimmon against the side of the slow cooker to check it's doneness.

Cover with a lid and cook for approximately 4 to 6 hours. You know they are done with you can squish a piece against the side of the slow cooker without too much resistance.

The persimmons, transferred to a colander to be mashed.

Now you have three options. You can transfer the persimmons to a colander set over a pot or bowl to catch the pulp. (You can discard any water left behind in the slow cooker, but use about a ยผ cup when mashing or blending. Just enough for an apples sauce consistency.)

Mashing the persimmons with a potato masher to make the persimmon pulp.

Start mashing them.

Blending the persimmons with a hand blender to get the right consistency for persimmon pulp.

If you find that you are not getting enough pulp to come out (this can happen, it’s not a big deal), simply transfer the persimmons and a small amount of their cooking water to a food processor, or use a hand blender directly in the bowl.

The finished persimmon pulp sitting in a white, square dish.

Blend in pulses until you have the consistency of apple sauce. Store in the fridge up to 4 days or freeze up to 6 months.

More Persimmon Recipes

Copyright Information For The Gracious Pantry

Persimmon Pulp Recipe

A square, white dish filled with persimmon pulp sits on a white, marble counter.

Persimmon Pulp

Persimmon pulp is ridiculously easy to make and makes a wonderful base for many recipes including persimmon bread, jam and candy.
5 from 1 vote
Print Pin Rate
Course: Base Recipes
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 4 hours
Total Time: 4 hours 20 minutes
Servings: 1 batch
Calories: 300kcal
Author: The Gracious Pantry

CLICK TO WATCH THIS RECIPE IN ACTION!

Equipment

  • Slow Cooker
  • Colander OR hand blender OR food processor

Ingredients

  • 4 medium Fuyu persimmons
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups water (or less. You don't want to fully cover the persimmons, so if you don't need it all, don't use it all.)

Instructions

  • Wash, de-stem and cut the persimmons into quarters.
    The persimmons cut and de-stemmed and ready to go into the slow cooker.
  • Put the persimmons, water and cinnamon in a slow cooker.
    The persimmons, cinnamon and water in the slow cooker, ready to cook.
  • Cover with a lid and cook for approximately 4 to 6 hours. You know they are done with you can squish a piece against the side of the slow cooker without too much resistance.
    Squishing a persimmon against the side of the slow cooker to check it's doneness.
  • Now you have three options. You can transfer the persimmons to a colander set over a pot or bowl to catch the pulp. (You can discard any water left behind in the slow cooker, but use about a ยผ cup when mashing or blending. Just enough for an apples sauce consistency.)
    The persimmons, transferred to a colander to be mashed.
  • Start mashing them.
    Mashing the persimmons with a potato masher to make the persimmon pulp.
  • If you find that you are not getting enough pulp to come out (this can happen, it's not a big deal), simply transfer the persimmons and a small amount of their cooking water to a food processor, or use a hand blender directly in the bowl.
    Blending the persimmons with a hand blender to get the right consistency for persimmon pulp.
  • Blend in pulses until you have the consistency of apple sauce. Store in the fridge up to 4 days or freeze up to 6 months.
    The finished persimmon pulp sitting in a white, square dish.

Notes

Please note that the nutrition data below is a ballpark figure. Exact data is not possible.

Nutrition

Serving: 1entire batch | Calories: 300kcal | Carbohydrates: 80g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 26mg | Potassium: 703mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin C: 150mg | Calcium: 125mg | Iron: 6mg

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55 Comments

  1. Kae Vampola says:

    You don’t indicate how much/many persimmon you use for the pulp … one or twelve or?????

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Kae – I updated the recipe. It’s a loose measurement. I was using my crock pot and I used enough to fill up the pot.

  2. Looks like a wickedly easy process. When you say to “clean” the fruit, do you also mean topeel them? Or will a simple rinse and wipe do?

    1. Anonymous says:

      Folly – A simple rinse and wipe is all you need! Enjoy!

  3. Anonymous says:

    Tina – No, you want the sieve. It’s a bit more work, but it separates out all the stuff you don’t want.

  4. Looks so yummy can not wait to try it

  5. graciouspantry says:

    Sure, just email the recipe. I’d love to see it. Thanks!

  6. Any chance we an use our juicer to get the pulp?

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      No, it won’t do the same thing. Sorry!

  7. Lonnie Bewernitz says:

    Good Morning,

    I tried the persimmon pulp recipe using the crockpot adding water and cinnamon with high hopes. However, the result was disappointing, and I ended up throwing the persimmons away. The cinnamon took away the persimmon taste and the result was similar to the astringent taste resulting from eating a not ripe persimmon. Also and more importantly, trying to separate the persimmon pulp from the seeds/skin/stem using a strainer was impossible without using a spoon to individually separate each seed from the cooked goo.

    I will revert to my time consuming process of removing the seeds from each persimmon then pressing out the pulp using a hand food mill.

    Thanks and good luck with your business!

    Lonnie B

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Lonnie – What type of persimmons did you use? Something definitely went wrong there. Mine was not even close to what you describe here.

    2. Catherine says:

      I am puzzled about the seed part. The persimmon I used tonight have no seeds. I just peeled them, took the harder core out, cut them up in little pieces and used them in my โ€œpuddingโ€ recipe. It was very easy and yummy.

      1. Catherine – If yours didn’t have any seeds, then not to worry. Sounds like it worked just fine! ๐Ÿ™‚

    3. The same thing happened to meโ€”they tasted sweet and ripe raw, but separated and went horribly astringent in the slow cooker. I used hachiyas. I have no idea why that would have happened!

  8. sounds like Lonnie used the native persimmon to North America. they are about the size of quarters and full of dime sized seeds. your picture indicates you are using some of the asian persimmons that are tennis ball sized and no seeds.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Debbie – Thanks! ๐Ÿ™‚

      1. I was recently introduced to the Asian persimmon by a co worker. Instant addiction. I simply wash it and eat everything but the hardened bloom on top of them.

        1. The Gracious Pantry says:

          Beverly – That’s awesome! ๐Ÿ™‚

  9. I am in South Korea and recently a student gave me a BUNCH of persimmons. They have seeds and are delicious, but I would like to make some pulp. I unfortunately do not have a slowcooker, but rather a pressure cooker and a regular saucepan. As I am in a small South Korean apartment, I also have no oven, just two burners. Can i make this pulp in my pressure cooker? or should I just boil in my regular saucepan?

    Thanks!

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Erin – I have no experience with a pressure cooker, so I can’t advise you there. But it should work okay in a pot. Just keep an eye on the liquid levels. A slow cooker retains much more moisture. It will cook down faster in a pot. Hope that helps.

  10. Hi! I don’t have a crok pot/slow cooker – and was going to try to make the persimmon bread today. Is there a way to make the pulp with cooking the persimmons?

    Say just using a food processor?

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Chloe – This has to cook. So you could probably do it on the stovetop, but watch it very carefully. Stir often. Then if needed you can put it through a strainer or food processor.

  11. I once made a large batch of persimmon butter… but it turned astringent. Had something to do with the cooking, because the persimmons were ripe when I started. Did none of your persimmon “applesauce” have an astringent taste to it? I don’t want to go through that again, I had to throw it all out.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Lisa – No, not a single drop. What type of persimmons did you use?

  12. Hi. I have a bunch of fuyu permissions. I was excited to start baking when a friend said those r not for baking. So into the produce drawer they go n my refrigerator. Well now its been a month and they r super soft and squishy. I tried one and tastes fine. Can I use the rest to make persimmon cookies?

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Karla – Typically, the fuyu persimmons are great for baking. But you don’t generally wait until they are that soft. They are usually eaten or used when still firm. I’ve never used very soft ones so it’s hard for me to say. I would just google it and see what you come up with. Here’s some info I found: http://localfoods.about.com/od/persimmons/tp/persimmons.htm

      1. Virginia Bettencourt says:

        I have a Fuyu persimmon tree. You can prepare pulp for recipes by freezing whole ripe fruit. Then skin will slip off the frozen fruit easily under running water. Remove the stem and then the seeds as the fruit thaws. It is now ready to mix into recipes.

        1. The Gracious Pantry says:

          Virginia – Good to know! Thank you!

  13. Thank you for quick reply. I will make the cookies soon and let you know how they turn out.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Karla – Please do!

  14. I’m wondering why you feel the need to cook the pulp before you freeze it? I live in Indiana where American persimmons are common and grow in the wild. Once they drop to the ground, we collect them, mash them and freeze. We never pre-cook or add water or flavoring.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Kelly – That’s just the way I’ve always done it. ๐Ÿ™‚

  15. So I think I’m a little confused. Can I use native persimmons or not ?? Please help. Was planning to try this this weekend. Thanks.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Pam – I don’t know of a type called “Native”. Are you referring to the Hachiya or the Fuyu?

  16. Mary O Richardson says:

    I just made the jam using Hachiya persimmons that were fully ripe. The pulp cooked all night on low in my slow cooker. The result was bitter and astringent – as if I had used an unripe persimmon, which I did not. Is there a recipe that will work for Hachiya persimmons??

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Mary – When you say they were fully ripe, were they so soft they seemed like they had gone bad? That’s how you know they are ripe. If they don’t reach that extremely soft and mushy stage, they won’t be sweet at all. And I do mean, very, very mushy and soft like a rotten pumpkin.

  17. Mary O Richardson says:

    Thank you for this. Now I am wondering if that was the problem. Most of them were so ripe they were shiny inside, but one was just nicely soft, not mushy. I ate part of it raw and thought it was sweet. I should try again, but I’ve got to throw these 6 pints out. So wasteful!

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Mary – Sorry. ๐Ÿ™ I wish there was a way to save them, but I’ve never used that type of persimmon, so I don’t know if there’s a fix. Really wish I could be more help.

  18. Do you have to bake the pulp? I have made persimmon pudding and love it, but had thought about adding some to a no bake cheesecake.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Debbie H – You don’t have to, no. But you certainly can.

  19. Rachel Martin says:

    Made this last night/this morning with my neighbor’s California Fuyu persimmons! Worked great! I would just say next time I’d add less cinnimon, as I am going to put the pulp in a cookie recipe that already calls for cinnamon. Pushing the persimmons through the strainer is a great workout, too ๐Ÿ˜‰

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Rachel – Haha! Ya, nothing like getting a good workout while you cook! ๐Ÿ˜€ Enjoy!

  20. how about american wild persimmons. i find no mention and they have seeds so what to do.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Mark – It would be more work, but not impossible. You would definitely need to remove the seeds. Make sure they are fully ripe. They should have the feel and appearance of being almost over ripe. A little mushy and slightly wrinkled.

  21. Ruth Devlin says:

    Iโ€™m making persimmon pulp in my crockpot for the first time and am not sure how much water to use…

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Ruth – I would fill the crock about 1/3 of the way with water. Try putting the persimmons in first, and then filling the crock about half way. That usually gets the job done. If your pulp is very dry, its easy to add more water. If it’s very wet, you can always cook the pulp with the lid off for a few additional hours on high temp.

  22. You don’t mention how much water to put into this recipe?

  23. Yvonne Ruiz says:

    Do I have to make pulp to use for bread? Iโ€™ve tried 2 different recipes for persimmon bread and neither one worked out. Iโ€™m so determined to make it!!!

    1. Yvonne – Yes, because of the consistency. It’s similar to baking with apple sauce. That is, assuming you are talking about my persimmon bread recipe. I can’t speak for somebody else’s recipe.

  24. I wonder, how long would it take to cook if you DON’T have a crock pot/slow cooker?!!

    1. Linda – I would simmer it on the stove top. I’m guessing about an hour, give or take. Just keep the heat low and stir occasionally to make sure nothing is burning on the bottom of the pot.

  25. Sue Frederick says:

    5 stars
    I love your site! Found it by searching for persimmon pulp. My husband is quite ill and eats very few things, one of them being persimmon pudding, a recipe from his grandmother. Last week his brother flew down from Illinois and brought with him frozen persimmon pulp from wild persimmons around their house. A delight for my husband. Any chance you know where to find persimmon pulp? I don’t see any persimmons in the store. Thank you so much!

    1. Sue – Welcome! Happy you found me! ๐Ÿ™‚ I have never purchased persimmon pulp. I have only made it myself. I didn’t even know it was possible to purchase it. Persimmons are an annual thing, so it may be quite difficult to find it in the stores until later in the year, if they carry it at all. I wish I knew more. Have you tried amazon?

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