Fig Butter Recipe

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This fig butter is delicious on your morning, whole grain toast!

I have two fig trees outside my front door. They seem to take turns offering up their delicious fruits, so I’ve had a plentiful supply since I moved into my new place.

Clean Eating Fig Butter Recipe

What To Do With Lots Of Fresh Figs?

While there are tons of fig recipes out there, my favorite way to eat them is as a jam or fruit butter. I enjoy this because first, it tastes great, and second, it uses up a ton of figs in one batch.

Figs can be enjoyed raw, with a few different cheeses such as goat cheese, blue cheese, brie and more. Pair all that with some whole grain crackers for a delicious snack or appetizer. You can even put figs in homemade ice cream! (Though for flavor, it’s better to use a butter like this with a few fresh figs thrown in for texture).

Figs pair well with meats such as chicken, beef or pork. They are wonderful roasted with any of these meats.

What Does Fig Butter Taste Like?

The only way I can describe it is that it has the sweetness of any jam, but with a sort of “raising” or molasses” flavor from the figs. Figs truly have a flavor all their own. A fresh fig is sweet (depending on the variety), fresh and chewy with a bit of coarseness from the seeds.

Are You Supposed To Peel Figs?

The only thing you definitely want to discard from a fig is the stem. As long as they are washed, you can eat the skin along with the flesh. Some people do prefer to peel them, but that’s a matter of personal preference. It’s worth noting that some varieties of figs might taste better without their skin, but again, that’s a personal choice. The skin is edible, the stem is not.

How To Use Fig Butter

This butter is wonderful stuff. Primarily, you can use it on your morning toast. But it’s equally delicious with other things. Here are some suggestions:

  • with graham crackers for dessert
  • over vanilla ice cream
  • glaze pork chops
  • add to a grilled cheese sandwich
  • add to a quesadilla
  • use on crostini
  • use to glaze roast chicken
  • mix with Sriracha sauce for a delicious wing sauce
  • spread over flatbread with smoked blue cheese
  • stuff chicken breasts with fig butter and goat cheese

What You’ll Need

  • 4 lb. figs (stems removed)
  • 4 cups apple juice (no sugar added, 100% juice)
  • 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp. pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon

How To Make Fig Butter

  • Place all ingredients in a pot and bring to a boil.
  • Immediately reduce to a simmer and cook until the figs are very soft.
  • Using an immersion blender (or transfer to a regular blender), blend the figs while they still have some liquid left in the pot. If you have to add more juice or some water, feel free. Blending this without enough liquid will leave you with a very thick paste. So add liquid as needed to get the consistency you like. If the fig butter is not sweet enough for you, now would be a good time to add some honey or maple syrup.
  • Blend until smooth and transfer to a jar. Store for up to 2 weeks in the fridge or up to 6 months in the freezer.

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Fig Butter Recipe

Clean Eating Fig Butter Recipe

Fig Butter

Enjoy this fig butter on your morning toast! It’s delicious and comforting first thing in the morning. It even goes well over vanilla ice cream! Use it like you would use jam or marmalade. It’s yummy!
Print Pin Rate
Course: Condiments
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings: 1 batch (yield varies based on how much you boil it down)
Calories: 1869kcal
Author: The Gracious Pantry

Equipment

  • Immersion Blender

Ingredients

  • 4 lb. figs (stems removed)
  • 4 cups apple juice (no sugar added, 100% juice)
  • 1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp. pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon

Instructions

  • Place all ingredients in a pot and bring to a boil.
  • Immediately reduce to a simmer and cook until the figs are very soft.
  • Using an immersion blender (or transfer to a regular blender), blend the figs while they still have some liquid left in the pot. If you have to add more juice or some water, feel free. Blending this without enough liquid will leave you with a very thick paste. So add liquid as needed to get the consistency you like. If the fig butter is not sweet enough for you, now would be a good time to add some honey or maple syrup.
  • Blend until smooth and transfer to a jar. Store for up to 2 weeks in the fridge or up to 6 months in the freezer.

Notes

Please note that the nutrition data is a ballpark figure. Exact data is not possible. Data given is for the entire batch. Yield varies based on how much you boil it down. Divide this data by the number of servings you end up with.

Nutrition

Serving: 1batch | Calories: 1869kcal | Carbohydrates: 469g | Protein: 14g | Fat: 6g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 63mg | Potassium: 5211mg | Fiber: 57g | Sugar: 395g | Vitamin A: 2575IU | Vitamin C: 50.9mg | Calcium: 764mg | Iron: 8.3mg

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25 Comments

  1. graciouspantry says:

    My pleasure! Glad you enjoyed it!

    1. Deborah Testa Bodnar says:

      this spread is great on a fresh turkey sandwich.

      1. The Gracious Pantry says:

        Deborah – Oh yum!!! So glad you’re enjoying it! 😀

  2. Pingback: Goat Cheese, Fig, & Caramelized Onion Pizzettes
  3. Gammy Tammy says:

    If I wanted to can this product, would you happen to know if it could be processed in a water bath as opposed to a pressure canner?

    1. graciouspantry says:

      I’m sorry, I know nothing about canning. You would have to show the recipe to a master canner.

  4. Betty Boop says:

    I made this yesterday, with the bounty of figs from our garden. I filled up my large (6.5 quart) slow cooker, having washed & stemmed the figs. It took 20 hours for the juices to cook down – I had to leave it overnight so it might have been done sooner, but I didn’t want to get up at 3 a.m. to check! It is beautifully thick. I think that next time I will start out with 2 cups of apple juice, and top it up as needed.

    I was wondering about how long it took to cook down on the stove top, in case I decide to use that method.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Betty – That would really depend on how much you have in the pot and how much liquid you use. It’s definitely faster than a slow cooker, but again, timing depends on the amounts. If you follow this recipe, it would probably be about 1-4 hour depending on how low you keep the flame.

  5. Hi Tiffany, I made this tonight but it’s too runny. I didn’t let juice reduce enough. Do you have any tips so I can make it thicker?? It is yummy but not quite right.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Serina – If it’s still runny, just return it to a pot and reduce the liquid more over low heat.

  6. Thanks. Will it still reduce even though it has already been puréed?

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Serina – It should. Just watch it carefully. You may need to stir often to avoid burning on the bottom of the pot. Keep the heat low and let the liquid cook down.

  7. Hi again, it worked 🙂 I now have some thicker fig butter. I just had to be more patient, I didn’t realise it would take so long. Thanks again for your help & for sharing your recipe.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Serina – My pleasure! I hope you enjoy it! 😀

  8. Help. My 25 pounds of figs smelled fermented after I began cooking. The figs were absolutely delicious to start with not one fig bad.

    I added the ingredients that were given.

    I just kept filling the pot and ended up with that many figs so just was going to multiply the batch! My husband said I should have made such a big batch to start with !

    My only deviation was the amount if Apple juice! I only put in 8 cups because the pot wouldn’t hold any more. But I cooked it down and the consistency seems perfect but like I said the fermentation smell and now taste is really bad.

    Please help.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Naomi – The only thing I can figure is that the batch was too big and cooked for too long without enough liquid. I know that some people ferment figs on purpose, but I don’t know how to do that safely. I hate to say it, but I would throw the batch out. It doesn’t sound safe. I’m really sorry.

  9. Any idea if this would work with dried figs? What amount would I use?

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Kathy – I’ve never worked with dried figs, so I really have no idea. I’m sorry. 🙁

  10. Sandy the Magpie says:

    I made this, this weekend, with some pale yellow-green figs (somebody gave my mother a twig off their tree, years ago, and if they told her the variety, she forgot it, also years ago), and 1/2 a cinnamon stick (fished out before canning) instead of the ground. It is DELICIOUS (and I don’t like fresh figs), but took forever to cook down – I think next time (there will be a next time) I’ll use 3-4 grated apples instead of the juice.

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Sandy – Sounds wonderful! I’m glad it worked out! Enjoy! 😀

  11. Kathi Holsomback says:

    Ok, this is my first try do u put the whole fig in ? Outside skin and all?

    1. The Gracious Pantry says:

      Kathi – Yep! I just cut off the stems after washing.

  12. Emi Grace says:

    Is there a substitute for pure vanilla extract??

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