Oat Flour Pizza Crust [Gluten-Free Pizza Dough Recipe]

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Oat flour pizza crust is a great, healthy, low-glycemic, no-yeast, alternative to wheat flour. Give this all-natural recipe a try for your next pizza night.

Oats are a healthy whole grain that provide fiber and protein. Oat flour is also a nutritious alternative to white flour, and if you are gluten-free, you can use oat flour labeled as gluten-free to make a delicious, healthy pizza crust. This recipe will also give you step-by-step instructions to make oat flour at home.

An angled view of a ball of oat flour pizza crust dough sitting on a cutting board next to a white pitcher, a tomato and some fresh basil leaves.

Why Oat Flour Pizza Crust?

Like many people, I’ve gone gluten-free for health reasons. Like it or not, gluten-free eating is here to stay, and I’m so grateful it is! Oat flour gives you substance for a good, sturdy pizza crust that doesn’t fall apart like other gluten-free recipes. Arrowroot powder gives it a fluffier “bread-like” consistency so you don’t feel like you’re eating a brick with sauce on it. The spices give it great flavor, so all you have to do is add your favorite toppings.

Pizza-Making Tips

If you are adding any veggies to your pizza, I highly recommend sautéing them ahead of time. Cooking them with a little oil, salt, and pepper will go a long way to adding flavor to your pizza overall.

If you want to add even more flavor to your crust, once it’s cooked you can baste it heavily with a mixture of oil and more spices before adding your sauce and toppings.

Pizza Crust Variations

You can easily change, intensify or lessen the flavors in your crust by adjusting the spices you add. Love a good garlic crust? Add a bunch of freshly sautéd or roasted garlic to the dough! Prefer basil to Italian seasoning? Add it! The spices here are totally adjustable to your liking.

An overhead view looking down on a ball of oat flour pizza crust dough. A used wooden spoon rests next to it with flour and dough on it.

Recipe Tools

Some folks like to make pizza dough with kitchen appliances like a stand mixer or food processor.

  • Stand mixer – yes.
  • Food processor – no.

Us a paddle attachment on a stand mixer, but watch it carefully. This tends to be a tougher dough and you don’t want to burn out the motor on your stand mixer.

A food processor won’t be strong enough to work with this dough unless you happen to have an industrial-strength processor, which most folks don’t.

Baking The Crust

Parchment paper – For easy cleanup, you can put down parchment paper on your rimmed baking sheet, but it’s not necessary. This dough doesn’t do a lot of sticking if it’s cooked properly. So cleanup is pretty simple regardless.

Pizza stone – If you like making pizza on a pizza stone, you’ll have to flatten your dough directly on the stone. This isn’t a dough you can easily pick up and move from a work surface to the stone. You can flatten it out a bit first, but get it on a cold stone from the beginning. While pizza stones should usually be hot when you put the dough on, it just won’t work well here. So if this is your preference, you may need to experiment a bit with this dough to work it just right for the stone.

Topping Ideas

Here are just a few ideas to get your creativity flowing in the toppings department:

  • Mushrooms
  • Bacon
  • Pepperoni – I have found reasonably healthy versions at Whole Foods.
  • Mozzarella cheese
  • Tomatoes
  • Peppers
  • Spinach
  • Onions
  • Chicken
  • Pineapple
  • Arugula
  • Red pepper flakes
  • Parmesan cheese

Dairy-Free Pizza

If you are dairy-free like me, you have two choices in the cheese department.

You can make your pizza without any cheese at all, or you can use dairy-free/vegan cheese. They take a little getting used to, but after a while, they aren’t too bad. And no, they are not considered clean. But when you can’t have dairy, it’s a decision you have to make for yourself.

A close up of a ball of oat flour pizza crust dough sitting on a cutting board.

Oat Flour Pizza Crust Ingredients

Oat flour – Labeled as gluten-free if needed.

Arrowroot powder – In a pinch, you can use cornstarch. But arrowroot is better.

Garlic granules – Garlic powder works fine too.

Italian seasoning

Ground black pepper

Salt – I used pink Himalayan salt, but use whatever you normally use in the kitchen.

Oil – Any type will work. I have used coconut oil, avocado oil, and olive oil. Avocado oil has the highest smoke point if that’s of concern.

Water – You’ll start with 1 cup. You might not use the rest, but have it handy.

How To Make Oat Flour Pizza Crust

Flour, spices and salt sitting in a stainless steel mixing bowl.

Dry Ingredients

In a large bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients.

Liquid added to a flour mixture in a mixing bowl. A wooden spoon rests inside the bowl.

Wet Ingredients

Stir in the wet ingredients. Do NOT add more than 1 cup of water at this stage.

A hand mixing dough in a stainless steel mixing bowl.

Kneading

When you can’t stir any longer, use your hands to knead the dough, adding a little more water if needed.

A ball of Oat Flour Pizza Crust dough in a stainless steel mixing bowl.

Making Crust

Once you are done kneading the dough, note that the longer it rests, the more the flour will absorb the liquid. So you either need to spread it over your pizza pan immediately while it’s still easy to work with, or you’ll end up needing to knead in more water to make the dough more pliable. Your best bet is to spread it over a pizza pan immediately after mixing.

A just finished ball of oat flour pizza crust sits on a wooden cutting board with a used wooden spoon laying next to it with flour and dough on it.

Baking The Crust

Bake at 400 F. for 20 minutes, or until cooked through. Top your pizza and return to the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until the cheese is melted.

How To Store Oat Flour Pizza Crust

Ball – If you need to make this ahead of time, add just a bit more water than you think you need. Oat flour will soak up the water over time. Make a ball, coat it in oil and then wrap it in plastic wrap and store it in the fridge until you are ready to use it.

Crust – If you have already rolled out the dough into a crust, spray it evenly with oil and then cover the entire pizza pan and crust with plastic wrap and store the whole thing in the fridge until you are ready to bake it.

Baked – If you have already baked the crust, store it without toppings, covered with plastic wrap, until you are ready to add your toppings.

Topped – Once the pizza is topped, baked, and cut, you can store the pieces in an airtight food container and keep it in the fridge for up to 3 days with meat on it, or 4 days without meat on it (just veggies and cheese).

Can You Freeze Oat Flour Pizza Crust?

If you want to freeze this for future use, it’ll require a very small amount of forethought. Add a little more water to the dough than you think you need. Roll the dough flat on a pan, spray with oil, and store the whole thing in the freezer.

Do not freeze this dough as a dough ball.

Recipe Supplies

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Pizza pan sold on Amazon.
Pizza cutter sold on Amazon.
Set of mixing bowls sold on Amazon.

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Oat Flour Pizza Crust Recipe Card + Video

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A ball of pizza dough sits on a cutting board next to a white pitcher, a fresh tomato and some fresh basil leaves.

Oat Flour Pizza Crust

Delicious, thick pizza crust without the gluten.
5 from 5 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Breads
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 1 large crust
Calories: 2185kcal
Author: The Gracious Pantry

CLICK TO WATCH THIS RECIPE IN ACTION!

Equipment

  • 1 Large mixing bowl

Ingredients

  • 3 cups oat flour (gluten-free if needed)
  • 1 cup arrowroot powder
  • 1 tsp. garlic granules (or garlic powder)
  • 1 tbsp. Italian seasoning
  • ½ tsp. ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • cups water (You might not use all of it, but have it handy)

Instructions

  • In a large mixing bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients.
    Flour, spices and salt sitting in a stainless steel mixing bowl.
  • Stir in the wet ingredients. Do NOT add more than 1 cup of water at this stage.
    Liquid added to a flour mixture in a mixing bowl. A wooden spoon rests inside the bowl.
  • When you can't stir any longer, use your hands to knead the dough, adding a little more water if needed.
    A hand mixing dough in a stainless steel mixing bowl.
  • Once you are done kneading the dough, note that the longer it rests, the more the flour will absorb the liquid. So you either need to spread it over your pizza pan immediately while it's still easy to work with, or you'll end up needing to knead in more water to make the dough more pliable. Your best bet is to spread it over a pizza pan immediately after mixing.
    A ball of Oat Flour Pizza Crust dough in a stainless steel mixing bowl.
  • Bake at 400 F. for 20 minutes, or until cooked through. Top your pizza and return to the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until the cheese is melted.
    A just finished ball fo pizza dough sits on a wooden cutting board with a used wooden spoon laying next to it with flour and dough on it.

Notes

Please note that the nutrition data given here is a ballpark figure. Exact data is not possible. Data is for the entire recipe. Divide this by the number of pieces you cut it into for individual serving counts.

Nutrition

Serving: 1entire recipe | Calories: 2185kcal | Carbohydrates: 356g | Protein: 54g | Fat: 61g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 20g | Monounsaturated Fat: 28g | Trans Fat: 1g | Sodium: 2417mg | Potassium: 1462mg | Fiber: 30g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 91IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 348mg | Iron: 17mg
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6 Comments

  1. What does the arrowroot do? Could I sub cornstarch? Thanks

    1. Nancy – The arrowroot is for consistency. It also helps hold things together. Yes, you can usually substitute cornstarch. However, I have not tried it, so I can’t vouch for how it will turn out.

  2. 5 stars
    I made this 6/17/22 and it’s fantastic! I used the cornstarch, added more garlic powder, Italian seasoning and additional no-salt seasoning for coloring along with cayenne pepper to the crust. This recipe tasted better than rising crust without being gummy.

  3. Stephanie says:

    5 stars
    I’ve been looking for an easy, tasty GF, DF, yeast free, pizza crust recipe and I finally found it. it’s so much better than the one i would buy. I’ve made it a handful of times so far. Clean, nutrient dense ingredients and you can spice it however you like to add flavour to the crust. I would highly recommend trying this.
    Also, i can’t have onion or garlic and would just use a blend of Italian spices.

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